Thursday, December 31, 2009

Carpenters Center catches Globe's eye

The Boston Globe and Boston.com today featured a story about the Carpenters Center being built by the New England Regional Council of Carpenters.
Motorists stuck on the Southeast Expressway soon will have something besides radios and cellphones to grab their attention: trainees learning carpentry at the new Carpenters Center in Dorchester.

The striking $19 million, 75,000-square-foot home of the New England Regional Council of Carpenters is being readied for a Feb. 1 opening on the edge of the expressway. At drivers’ eye level, and less than 30 feet from the southbound travel lane, will be oversize windows that look in on the training center for area carpenters.
The entire story can be read here

Monday, December 28, 2009

Carpenters Going Green: Point Breakdown Category 3- Energy and Atmosphere

8 Points

1. Optimize Energy Performance Exceed the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers ASHRAE 90.1 Energy Standard by 10.5%
2. Optimize Energy Performance Exceed ASHRAE 90.1 by 14%
3. Optimize Energy Performance Exceed ASHRAE 90.1 by 17.5%
4. Optimize Energy Performance Exceed ASHRAE 90.1 by 21%
5. Optimize Energy Performance Exceed ASHRAE 90.1 by 24.5%
6. Optimize Energy Performance Exceed ASHRAE 90.1 by 28%
7. Optimize Energy Performance Exceed ASHRAE 90.1 by 31.5%

The Carpenters Center was modeled in order to predict how much the design of the building would save money in energy use per year. Comparing it to a typical building using the ASHRAE 90.1-2004 Energy Standard, the project uses 31.5% less energy then a typical building



8. Enhanced Refrigerant Management - all HVAC units for this project are specified to use R-410a refrigerant, and therefore do not use either Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or Hydrofluorocarbons (HCFC) refrigerants.

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Then and now

February 2009



December 2009

Monday, December 21, 2009

Carpenters Going Green: Point Breakdown Category 2- Water Efficiency

3 Points Attained

1.Water Efficient Landscaping – The project is required to reduce water consumption by 50%. The planting plan at the Carpenters Center involves using native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers that have low water needs. The plan reduces potable water consumption by 73.5%.




2.Water Use Reduction – 20% Reduction from baseline water use

3.Water Use Reduction – 30% Reduction from baseline water use. The Carpenters Center has low-flow toilets, low-flow urinals, and low-flow faucets with sensors throughout the building.

A similar building with an occupancy of 200 persons using conventional fixtures and water closets uses 478,400 gallons of potable water per year. This project will only use 294,320 gallons per year – a 38% savings per year.

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Carpenters Going Green: Point Breakdown Category 1- Sustainable Sites

8 Points Attained

1. Site Selection - the site was formerly developed and consists entirely of an existing building and paving.

2. Development Density and Community Connectivity - a dense urban site. Within a .5 mile radius of the building’s main entrance there are at least 2 zones that can be designated as residential zones and many basic services within pedestrian access. Basic services include retail, grocery, banks, restaurants, places of worship, schools and a fire station.

3. Public Transportation Access - located .4 miles from Andrews Station and .3 miles from JFK/UMass. MBTA bus stop in front of building.



4. Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms -providing covered and secured bicycle storage for a minimum of 5% of the peak building users. The bike racks are located in bike storage room on Level 1 of the garage. One showering facility is required for the 167 occupents - located on level 2 of building.

5. Low-Emission & Fuel Efficient Vehicles - providing preferred parking spaces for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles for 5% of the total parking capacity. Spaces will be signed for low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles and will be close to main entrance.

6. Stormwater Design – the project will capture and treat 90% of the average annual rainfall and remove 80% of total suspended solids. There are five 8’ diameter drywells surrounded in crushed stone that will act as a retention system with capacity for infiltration.



7. Heat Island Effect – Non-Roof - 50% of the site hardscape (roads, sidewalks, courtyards and parking lots) have a Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) of at least 29. 63.9% of the project’s hardscape meets that minimum by using a light grey concrete (parking garage deck).

8. Heat Island Effect – Roof - A white high albedo roof for the entire surface – Carlisle SynTec’s Sure-weld TPO white membrane roofing. The roof has a Solar Reflectance Index of 110, which exceeds minimum requirement of SRI 78.

Friday, December 11, 2009

Carpenters Center Going Green

The green building movement arose out of the desire for more energy efficient and environmentally friendly building practices. It is a way to minimize both resource consumption and the impact building has on the environment. Green construction methods can be integrated into buildings at any stage, from design and construction, to renovation and demolition.

Green design and building practices significantly reduce or eliminate negative environmental impacts and create sustainable buildings. The most common standard for building green is the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The LEED Green Building Rating System, developed by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC), is a nationally accepted standard for the design, construction and operation of green buildings. According to the USGBC website there are 35,000 projects currently participating in the LEED system, comprising over 4.5 billion square feet of construction space in all 50 states and 91 countries.

LEED for New Construction is a rating system where building projects earn points for satisfying criteria designed to address specific environmental impacts inherent in the design, construction, operations and management of a building.

These points are grouped into six environmental categories:
1. Sustainable Sites, 14 point maximum
2. Water Efficiency, 5 point maximum
3. Energy and Atmosphere, 17 point maximum
4. Materials and Resources, 13 point maximum
5. Indoor Environmental Quality, 15 point maximum
6. Innovation & Design Process, 5 point maximum.

Points are achieved by meeting or exceeding specified requirements in each category. LEED for New Construction ratings are then awarded according to the following scale: Certified, 26-32 points; Silver, 33-38 points; Gold, 39-51 points; Platinum, 52-69 points.

Upon completion, the Carpenters Center will be on target to qualify for LEED Certified status, aiming to receive all 32 of the 26-32 points required.

In the coming weeks, the point breakdown for the certification of the Carpenters Center will be outlined in this blog.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Exterior Systems 90% complete

The process of installing exterior panels is 90% complete. The final sections, which will be completed in the coming weeks, include the Alucobond paneling located at the loading dock and a section of panels at the northern most part of the building.

Crews have finished installing the cedar accents on the exterior of the building. They are now installing cedar in the main lobby pavilion. These accents will be found in the area adjacent to the main stairs and on the terrace, adjacent to the pavilion.

Facts about the cedar being installed at the Carpenters Center (as previously posted)

  • The western red cedar has a custom tongue and groove shape, giving it a unique appearance and stronger interlocking connection than typical tongue and groove products.
  • The cedar is from 100 year old trees and has roughly 15 rings per inch, making it a long-lasting product with an expected lifetime of 50 years.
  • The cedar sealant is a water-soluble silicone based water-proofer that is less harsh on the environment than oil based products and emits no VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds).

Friday, December 4, 2009

Crews are busy completing work on third floor

Painting, with the exception of the final coat and touch ups, which will both happen after the flooring is installed, is complete on the third floor. Ceiling installation is also complete on the third floor, the lights have also been installed.



The third floor bathrooms are nearly complete. Floorlayers working for SMR Flooring have completed the installation of slate tile on the floors and ceramic tile on the wet walls. Plumbers with E.M. Duggan have installed the toilets.



All of the case work and cabinetry on third floor is complete. This installation, along with the wood paneling was done by carpenters working for Archer Corp. Both the case work/cabinetry and the wood paneling were manufactured by Millwork One in Providence, RI. The paneling was installed in the hallway off the reception area, inside the large conference room and break room and along the hallway near the conference room at the southeast corner of the building.



All interior glass has been measured and will be installed in the coming weeks.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

Green area renamed

The Carpenters Union worked in conjunction with neighbors in the area to spruce up the pedestrian cut-though located on the corner of Dorchester Ave. and Howell Street.

The park has been renamed Paul’s Triangle in memory of long time Howell Street resident and community advocate Paul Markilis. Mr. Markilis’ family still resides on the street.

The neighborhood surrounding the park and the Carpenters Center is known as the ‘Polish Triangle.’ In this area, Dorchester Avenue, Boston Street and Columbia road converge, literally, into a triangle that extends out into South Boston.

The triangular design of the pergola built by the Carpenters Union is part of an effort to brand the Polish Triangle neighborhood.


Desmond Rohan, neighbor and member of the McCormick Civic Association, which is involved in various beautification efforts throughout the community, including Paul’s Triangle, recently thanked the Carpenters Union saying, “Your efforts will certainly make it possible to continue improving the area and without your support we would not have made the progress we have to date.”

The McCormack Civic Association, through the support of local merchants and businesses, recently hung wreaths for the holiday season along Dorchester Ave. To learn more about this group, visit their website at www.mccormackcivic.com.

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

88%

As of November 30th, construction of the Carpenters Center is 88% complete!                           

Thursday, November 26, 2009

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Neighborhood improvement project

The Carpenters Union has joined efforts with neighbors in the community to spruce up the pedestrian cut-through located on the corner of Dorchester Ave. and Howell Street.




A set of stairs were installed in the green area connecting Dorchester Ave to Washburn Street. Members of Piledrivers Local 56 fabricated the treads in the piledrivers shop. The the treads were cut to size, holes were predrilled, and the hardware to hold the treads in place was fabricated at the shop.

RDA Construction donated the greenheart timber used for the stair treads. This eco-friendly timber is used in dock and pier construction. The dense timber won’t rot when placed directly on the ground, as water cannot permeate it.

Other volunteers assembled a pergola in the green area. The douglas fir was donated by the Carpenters Union.

Friday, November 20, 2009

Interior Paint Colors

Painters with H.W. Ellis Painting Company, Inc. have been working in the interior of the building. The following is a selection of Benjamin Moore paint colors being used at the Carpenters Center.

Sugar Cookie                                   Desert Twilight
                        

Light Khaki                                      Nantucket Gray
                        


Thyme                                                Mink
                          


Snow White Eggshell

Friday, November 6, 2009

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Floorcoverers work on second floor

On the second floor of the building a unique project is ongoing with a crew of floorlayers from Local 2168 working for Allegheny Contract Flooring. The second floor of the building, while flat, was not level, due to the quantity of drains throughout the floor from the laundry facility that used to be housed in the building.

A process called Flooding is being implemented throughout the second floor to level the floor in preparation for flooring installation that will happen in the coming months.

The crew working for Allegheny Contract will see this process through from start to finish. First, the floor is prepped using a diamatic grinder (seen below). A bonding agent primer is painted on the prepped floor. The primer bonds to the existing floor and the new self leveling cement that will be poured on top.



Crews then begin the intricate process of determining the measurements necessary to level the floor. First, they strike a grid chalk line in four or three foot squares, depending on the size of the room. They are given a benchmark, which tells them where the zero mark lies for the elevation of the floor. Orange tabs are placed along the grid system and are later cut to the necessary lengths to reach that zero mark.



Using the leveler (seen below), a reading is given to determine how high up the floor needs to be to reach the zero mark. The worker seen here takes that measurement and writes it on the ground next to the orange tab. Each tab is then cut to the correct height, which will later help determine how much cement needs to be poured over a particular section of the floor.



The pallets of portland-based cement mix can be seen below. On this particular day, Allegheny Contract was working on an 8,000 square foot area that would require around 18 pallets of Portland cement mixture.


The crew works simultaneously to flood the floor. Workers pour cement into the mixer, which then runs through a hose into another room where the floor is flooded.



The floor will be dry enough to walk across within approximately 4 hours. While the floor won’t immediately be able to handle point loads, crews will be able to work in areas where the floor has been poured within 24 hours, as long as they protect the floors and use ladders.

Monday, November 2, 2009

Sunday, November 1, 2009

75%!

As of October 31st, construction of the Carpenters Center is 75% complete!

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Carpenters Center goes live with LED Display



The Carpenters Union went live today with a major component of the Carpenters Center: a 32’ H x 21’ W transparent LED display. The display is located at the South side of the building and is visible to traffic traveling north along I-93.

A striking component of the building’s fa├žade, the display is made up of horizontally-oriented LED sticks, offering superior brightness, contrast, and image quality. The display is perfectly suited for photographic images, both black and white and full color. It can handle millions of colors.

The horizontal orientation and spacing of the LED sticks allows for 53% transparency, while supporting an average of 40mm resolution. Technology evaluations provided the necessary image quality at viewing distances of 150’, or equal to the distance that passing cars will be viewing the display from the highway.


Looking out to the Expressway from inside the building.

There are only one or two transparent LED installations in the US which are approximately half the resolution of this display and 1/3 the potential brightness - making this sign clearly visible in the middle of the day.

The Carpenters Center display will meet all Federal Highway mandates including the minimum length of time an image must be displayed, known as the digital billboard’s “hold time.” The industry’s average digital displays hold time is 8 seconds.

Federal Highway Administration regulates digital display’s brightness by mandating that all digital displays be adjusted to compliment ambient light levels. This display’s brightness levels will be scheduled by a content delivery system that is able to adjust the brightness of the display to match the ambient light levels. This will ensure that the display’s brightness is appropriate to the time of day and seasonal light levels.

Selection and implementation of the LED Display was done with strong consideration given to its impact on the surrounding neighborhood. The display will have no paid advertising content and the brightness levels will comply with the regulations mentioned above.

"We want the sign to send a message about who we are, what we do, and our connections to the communities we live and work in,” notes Mark Erlich, NERCC Executive Secretary-Treasurer.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Then and Now

March 5, 2009


October 23, 2009

Thursday, October 22, 2009

Sidewalk poured, landscaping to begin



At the end of last week, S&F Concrete poured a section of sidewalk connecting the Pavilion to the city sidewalk as well as the patio adjacent to the Pavilion. Additionally, they poured the sidewalks adjacent to the parking deck and prepared the area for landscaping.

Tress will be planted along the perimeter of the patio and alongside the ramp entrance to the parking deck.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Asphalt to be placed at parking deck

Last week, a crew working with S&F Concrete completed the final pour at the parking deck. Asphalt is scheduled to be placed this week in the lower level of the deck up to the ramp.

As explained in an earlier post, visitors will enter from Dorchester Ave and drive on to the top level of the parking deck. The entryway ramp will be centered to the parking deck. The ramp itself is 32 feet wide, to accommodate traffic in either direction coming in and out of the garage, by approximately 25 feet long.

The upper parking deck will have 46 parking spaces and there will be 43 spaces in the lower deck. There will be an additional 6 spaces separate from the parking garage at the North end of the building.

The majority of the parking deck, including the entire upper parking deck is a concrete surface. One section, however, from the base of the ramp at the south side of the parking deck down to the lower level and the first section of the parking decking will be bituminous asphalt. In the lower level of parking deck along the abutter’s side, two vent windows were put in place to create cross ventilation. Asphalt will smoke and burn during a fire, so fire code requires proper ventilation in areas asphalt will be used.

Due to the concrete retaining wall along the north section, the lower level in this area of the garage will be concrete, which will crack under heat but will not smoke/burn as asphalt does.

The blueprint below highlights the area of the ramp and lower level of the garage that will be covered in asphalt instead of concrete. The pink highlights indicate the vent windows along the abutter’s side of the garage. The rendering below the prints shows that the Expressway side of the lower parking deck will be open, allowing air to move freely into the space.

Friday, October 16, 2009

Facts about the Exterior - Cedar

As previously posted, Sunrise Erectors also began installing cedar siding between windows on the West side of the building. Cedar accents were selected to help this side of the building conform to the look of the residential neighborhood. The cedar will be installed between windows on the third floor and in a section along the bottom of the windows on the second floor down to the Pavilion level.

Here is some information about the cedar being installed:

  • The western red cedar has a custom tongue and groove shape, giving it a unique appearance and stronger interlocking connection than typical tongue and groove products.
  • The cedar is from 100 year old trees and has roughly 15 rings per inch, making it a long-lasting product with an expected lifetime of 50 years.
  • The cedar sealant is a water-soluble silicone based water-proofer that is less harsh on the environment than oil based products and emits no VOCs.

Information provided by Sunrise Erectors.

Monday, October 12, 2009

LED Display Installed

At the end of last week the LED display was installed at the Carpenters Center.


Crews unload a section of the LED display.

The sign is 32’H x 21’W and arrived on site in 5 separate sections. The display is made up of horizontally-oriented LED sticks, seen below in a close-up photo.






The sign has superior brightness, contrast, and image quality, while allowing for greater than 50% transparency and supporting an average of 40mm resolution. Technology evaluations provided the necessary image quality at viewing distances of 150’, or equal to the distance that passing cars will be viewing the display from the highway.




Although it is 50% transparent, it is capable of displaying a 400 x 600 pixel image. The display can handle millions of colors.


The display will be the highest-resolution transparent LED display in the world and will be seen by over 280,000 viewers per day. There are only one or two transparent LED installations in the US which are approximately half the resolution of this display and 1/3 the potential brightness - making this sign clearly visible in the middle of the day.

The Carpenters Center display will meet all Federal Highway mandates including the minimum length of time an image must be displayed, known as the digital billboard’s “hold time.” The industry’s average digital displays hold time is 8 seconds.



Federal Highway Administration regulates digital display’s brightness by mandating that all digital displays be adjusted to compliment ambient light levels. This display’s brightness levels will be scheduled by a content delivery system that is able to adjust the brightness of the display to match the ambient light levels. This will ensure that the display’s brightness is appropriate to the time of day and seasonal light levels.

Information provided by Sensory Interactive.

Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Facts about the Exterior

  • There is over 27,000 square feet of insulation and membrane on the building.
  • There are 866 metal panels total, and their typical dimensions are roughly 2’ x 15’.
  • The largest panel sits at the top corner of the sloped wall near the highway: in addition to the face of the panel, it spans 45 inches over the parapet.
  • Most corner panels need their own box truck to arrive on the site without incurring any damage.
  • The paint colors for Carpenters Center metal panels took months to refine to achieve the level of gloss and shine that we see on the building today.
  • Some vertical members of the entry pavilion curtain wall weigh upwards of 700 lbs each.
  • The largest pieces of glass weight over 200 lbs each.

Information provided by Sunrise Erectors.

Friday, October 2, 2009

The Exterior of the Carpenters Center

From Suzanne O’Leary, Assistant Project Manager, Sunrise Erectors:
The Carpenters Center exterior is comprised of metal panel rainscreen, cedar tongue and groove rainscreen, curtain wall and storefront systems.

Alucobond panels are the primary material in the metal panel rainscreen, which we receive in the form of flat stock. The rainscreen acts as a second shell to the building, protecting the first layer from weathering and heavy moisture. Any moisture that does penetrate the rainscreen is allowed to dry out through various vents.

Sunrise Erectors fabricates each panel and piece of furring from flat material in their shop in Canton, MA before assembling and installing it. The panel colors were meticulously formulated and have a substantial amount of metallic fleck, adding to the range of each color as go past the building, similar to car paint.

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Photo Recap - September

68%!

As of September 30th, construction of the Carpenters Center is 68% complete!

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Alucobond Panel Installation

The installation of Alucobond panels is moving right along. The process includes varies steps. First, crews working for Sunrise Erectors screw galvanized light-gauge steel Z-clips through the ice and water shield (dark blue) that covers the building.



These clips are screwed in place every 16 inches, through the ice and water shield and into the metal stud of the exterior of the building. Between the Z-clips, 3-inch rigid Styrofoam insulation is put in place (light blue, above).

Across the face of the insulation the stand-off grid system is installed. These steel strips run vertically across the building. 90% of the stand-off grid work is complete.


The stips run vertically above and below the windows.

The Alucobond panels are clipped onto the stand-off steel grid.

At panel joints (where two panels meet) there is ½ inch spacing where you can see a reveal strip that is colored differently then the panels to give a shadow effect. On the second and third floors it is a dark bronze reveal and on the first floor it’s a gray reveal.

Panels are arriving on site every day from the fabrication shop, located in Canton, MA.



Sunrise Erectors also began installing cedar siding between windows on the West side of the building. Cedar accents were selected to help this side of the building conform to the look of the residential neighborhood. The cedar will be installed between windows on the third floor and in a section along the bottom of the windows on the second floor down to the Pavilion level.



Stainless Steel panels will run horizontally along the bottom of the building, wherever the building meets the ground or the lower level of the parking deck. Much like a back splash of a kitchen sink, this stainless steel will act as a back splash to handle things like salt, water and dirt that typically come in contact with this part of a building.